‘Kindred Spirits’ host Amy Bruni explains learn how to speak to ghosts, and shares a Queen Mary scare in new guide – San Bernardino Solar

Amy Bruni said she learned a lot about ghosts through decades of paranormal investigations.

The 44-year-old former star of the reality television series “Ghost Hunters” and current co-host and producer of Travel Channel’s “Kindred Spirits” grew up in a haunted house in Alameda, California and said she had her first encounter with the spirit world at the age of six.

Since then, she has said she has been to hundreds of locations around the world and witnessed countless paranormal activity, ranging from full body appearances to uncomfortable voices coming through her ghost hunting gear.

She has had all of these experiences and broken them down in her new book, Life with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Spirits, due out October 27th.

  • Paranormal investigators Adam Berry (left) and Amy Bruni, who could be seen at Comic-Con International in 2016, discussed their show “Kindred Spirits”. Bruni is releasing her new book, “Living with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Ghosts” on October 27th (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer, Getty Images).

  • Paranormal researcher and history researcher Amy Bruni will publish her new book “Living with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Ghosts” on October 27th. Bruni is known for her appearances on “Ghost Hunters” as well as for producing and co-hosting the “Kindred Spirits” of the Travel Channel.

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  • Adam Berry (left) and Amy Bruni introduced themselves speaking at an event in Los Angeles. Bruni is releasing her new book “Living with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Ghosts” on October 27th (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez, Getty Images for Reality Rocks)

  • Paranormal researcher and history researcher Amy Bruni will publish her new book “Living with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Ghosts” on October 27th. Bruni is known for her appearances on “Ghost Hunters” as well as for producing and co-hosting the “Kindred Spirits” of the Travel Channel. (Photo by Jason Kempin, Getty Images)

  • Paranormal researcher and history researcher Amy Bruni will publish her new book “Living with the Afterlife: 13 Truths I’ve Learned About Ghosts” on October 27th. Bruni is known for her appearances on “Ghost Hunters” as well as for producing and co-hosting the “Kindred Spirits” of the Travel Channel. (Courtesy photo by Lefebvre Photography)

Bruni finished the book in April and dealt with the current coronavirus pandemic in the last chapter. He noted that major national or global events like pandemics have historically generated more interest in the paranormal.

“I just recorded the audiobook, and frankly, the last chapter moved me to tears,” she said in a recent telephone interview.

At the time of our conversation, she was filming a crossover episode in Northern California and mentioned that she and her co-host, Kindred Spirits, Adam Berry, had shot several episodes of the show during the pandemic. There is still no premiere date for the new season.

“At the time we had no idea what was going to happen next, but I never thought the book would come out in October and we still wouldn’t really be in a safe room,” she continued. “A lot of the energy we’re giving off there right now is very stressful, and every time you bring that into the atmosphere, I feel like it encourages paranormal activity.”

Chances are that the pandemic has slowed down the busy lifestyle a bit and people are spending so much more time at home that they are more attuned to what is actually happening within their own four walls, she said, adding that it does would really be a perfect opportunity for amateur paranormal investigation of your own space.

“Maybe they are starting to notice things they have never done before,” she said. “It is also a time when people think a lot about their own mortality. Historically, that’s also what drives interest in the paranormal when people think about us all going to die at some point, and right now that’s all the time on our faces so people wonder what happens next. ”

Of course, Bruni also comes across a slew of skeptics in her work and insists that exposing paranormal activity is as important as checking it out.

“I had this discussion last night with someone who was a very big skeptic,” she said. “I said, ‘What if you’re wrong?’ Trust me, I get it. I can go through life and have some little experiences and say it’s nothing, but I’d rather pay attention to those moments – because what if they are real? What if someone is there I’d rather talk in the dark and be wrong about all of this than ignore it completely. I always tell people that they don’t have to be a full believer, just think about if you’re on the other side trying desperately to be communicate. “

In her book, Bruni reminds readers that ghosts are people too. This is important, she points out, as paranormal investigators communicate with ghosts. During the Haunted Salem: Live televised event in Massachusetts last year, Bruni said she and her crew came into contact with an entity claiming to be Lizzie Borden, the prime suspect in the 1892 ax murders of her father and stepmother .

“That was huge, you know – provided we actually spoke to her,” said Bruni. Her team did extensive research and found that Borden was named Lizbeth after the murders. They decided to communicate with the spirit by that name. Bruni said it worked.

“It was very intense and also a perfect example of how to get into something with a clean board and really think about things from a psychological point of view,” she said. “If this historical figure was standing in front of you and she was alive and you wanted to have a conversation, then you would be like, ‘Hey, did you kill your father and your stepmother? ‘No, you’re going to try to love yourself and have a real conversation. They try to think of things that they identify with and what is important to them. We did that to her and I hope that more investigators and people interested in the paranormal take the stance that you can’t always go with blazing guns. “

Bruni said that by communicating with hundreds of spirits, she also learned that not all spirits want to cross or should be instructed to “go to light.”

“What if they need something else,” she said. “Who should we tell what to do? It really isn’t our place. In all honesty, it is very selfish of us to think we know what to do. Instead of telling them to go, we would ask things like, “What do you need?” ‘What do you want?’ Sometimes the answers are noticeable. Often times, when you do extra work as an investigator, do research, and spend extra time with these ghosts, you begin to find out what they really are there for. If in some way you can resolve this for them, or in some way educate them, they often move on, or at least stop being that active. “

Bruni also shared her experiences in several of the most haunted places she’s been to, including The Queen Mary in Long Beach. She has had multiple experiences aboard the retired and docked British ocean liner which is now used as a hotel and entertainment venue. She confirmed that it is a hotbed for paranormal activity.

“I was there with a friend and we were filming and the walls are paper thin,” she said. “We heard two people in the room next to us talking extensively. It sounded like a couple had argued a little. “

When Bruni mentioned it to the hotel staff, she was informed that no one was in this room. She added that seeing the appearance of a ghost known as Henry on the ship is still one of the strangest things. According to ship lore, this ghost is that of a crew member who was knocked down from door number 13 below inside the ship.

Bruni describes the appearance as only getting through with half a body. Although room B340 is said to be the most haunted room on the ship, Bruni wrote in her book that much of the negative energy felt in this room could actually be generated by the people who visit it. It is entirely possible that the entity experienced by guests is what Bruni calls an “aggregor”.

“An aggregor is the idea that a spirit or a unit can be created by us,” she said. “We see it more and more specifically in a room like The Queen Mary, where people keep coming back and expecting something to happen, or an encounter, or something paranormal. You expose that nervous, nervous energy … over time, that energy becomes just what people expect. I mean, nobody goes to The Queen Mary and stays in B340 because they are looking for a romantic getaway. You go there to experience the ghosts and the paranormal experience. “

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